Nutritional
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Nutritional pedagogy and children

Nutritional diversity provides children with nutrients and choices about what they eat. Adopting basic healthy habits from an early age helps them to grow more effectively and avoid many problems as they get older.

Nutritional diversity provides children with nutrients and choices about what they eat. Adopting basic healthy habits from an early age helps them to grow more effectively and avoid many problems as they get older.

Children’s daily diets should include foods from all categories:

  • milk and dairy products,
  • meat,
  • fish,
  • chicken,
  • eggs,
  • legumes,
  • bread,
  • pasta,
  • rice,
  • potatoes,
  • fruit and vegetables,
  • olive oil

Food should be divided into small and frequent meals throughout the day. Food should be mainly ‘home-cooked’. It is worth noting that as far as it concerns water, it is recommended to consume 30ml of water per kg of body weight as children are more vulnerable to dehydration because they are hyperactive.

Make lunch fun and playful

You can make a beautiful table.Set by listening to music or serve food on coloured plates and bowls, with cutlery and napkins. In other words, enact their tasting adventures and make them want to dive headlong into their meal.

Put imagination and “dream” in their plate

Have you thought that with vegetables you can paint whole worlds on a child’s plate? Try to find a creative way to make the dish more enticing and mouth-watering in the child’s eyes. Offer the food in a form that is attractive, in the shape of an animal, in colorful fruits and vegetables for garnishing.

 

Serve small portions

Do not overfill children’s plates. Children are frightened by overloaded plates! Give them a little and explain that anyone who is still hungry can have more after emptying their plate. This helps children learn to listen to their bodies and become more aware of when they are full.

Little chefs in action

Encourage your children to get involved in food preparation. Get them involved in the process of choosing ingredients, including setting up a small greenhouse on the porch of your house. This way they learn and become familiar with healthy ingredients. By cooking with you they learn the rules of good nutrition and how to enjoy it better.

Homemade is better than processed

Say no to ready-made snacks from the supermarket. Prefer to give children home-made snacks, e.g. carrots and cucumbers cut into strips, or make e.g. cereal bars, fresh juices etc. Tupperware with home-made sandwiches and whatever else you can think of.

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